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NVIDIA GeForce4 Ti 4800 SE
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Applies to:

NVIDIA GeForce4 Ti 4800 SE

Author/Supplier:

NVIDIA

Category:

Graphics

Requirements:

Windows XP 32-bit

File Size:

40.5 MB

File Name:

93.71-forceware-winxp2k-english-whql.exe

Release Date:

11/02/06

Version:

93.71

Last Updated:

01.05.12

Rating:


4
/5 from 20 reviews.

Specifications:

  • Maximum Memory: 128 MB
  • Memory Bandwidth: 8.8 GBps
  • Operations per Second: 1.12 Trillion
  • Fill Rate: 4.4 Billion AA Samples/Sec
  • Vertices per Second: 125 Million

Description:

The design of NVIDIA GeForce4 Ti 4800 SE is based on NVIDIA nfiniteFX 2 Engine and NVIDIA Lightspeed Memory Architecture 2. The card sports memory bandwidth of 8.8 GB/sec, and comes with onboard memory of 128 MB. It is able to deliver Texture Fill Rate of 4.4 billion anti-aliased (AA) samples each second, while operating at maximum efficiency. The number of vertices it can render in a second is close to 125 million, allowing it to display complex 3D structures and textures. Altogether, the card can perform 1.12 trillion operations every second, allowing users to run games and movies at considerably high resolutions, without any significant reduction in framerates.

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The card has been designed using NVIDIA Lightspeed Memory Architecture II (often referred to as LMA II) as a template, and features 4 memory controllers operating independently. As a result, the device supports Auto-Precharge, and can execute commands related to that after every read or write operation done on any of the memory pages. Also, support for Lossless Z-Compression ensures that the processor of the card can always track how the Z-Value of each pixel displayed on screen is changing, dynamically. Also, the device supports Z-Occlusion Culling, which ensures that any pixel that will not be visible on screen during a particular moment is not processed by the graphics core at all. This frees up resources (in this case, clock cycles of the graphics processor), which can be used for rendering other pixels, elsewhere.